Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

linux:bashrc [2019/12/18 20:03] (current)
admin created
Line 1: Line 1:
 +====== .bashrc ======
 +
 +Your ''​.bashrc''​ file contains your bash shell user settings. ​
 +
 +===== ls colors =====
 +The color scheme used by ''​ls''​ is stored in the ''​$LS_COLORS''​ environment variable. By default this uses the color scheme configured in the ''​dircolors''​ database. You can see these settings using ''​dircolors --print-database''​.
 +
 +You can specify an alternative input file for ''​dircolors'',​ but if you just want to modify one or two settings it maybe easier to append them to ''​$LS_COLORS''​ near the end of ''​.bashrc'';​ e.g.:
 +<code bash>
 +LS_COLORS="​$LS_COLORS:​ow=1;​33"​
 +</​code>​
 +(This replaces the standard blue text on green background [[https://​unix.stackexchange.com/​questions/​94498/​what-causes-this-green-background-in-ls-output|used for other-writable files]] without the sticky bit set).
 +
 +===== .bash_profile =====
 +
 +In some (e.g. Mac-based) environments,​ you might find that your user settings are in the file ''​.bash_profile''​. To harmonize your environments you can set ''​.bash_profile''​ to apply your ''​.bashrc''​ (then carry on using ''​.bashrc''​ as usual):
 +
 +<code bash># Put this in your .bash_profile file.
 +if [ -f ~/.bashrc ]; then
 +   ​source ~/.bashrc
 +fi</​code>​
 +
 +https://​medium.com/​@tzhenghao/​a-guide-to-building-a-great-bashrc-23c52e466b1c
 +
 +
 +
 +{{tag> linux}}
 +~~DISCUSSION~~
 +